Math Glossary

The Harcourt Math GLossary site is a wonderful site to visually see many math concepts and math vocabulary for grades K-6.

 

Math Dictionary for Students

This site is a useful dictionary that provides definitions and illustrations for math vocabulary.

http://www.teachers.ash.org.au/jeather/maths/dictionary.html

 

How to cite your resources (or write a bilbiography)

BIBLIOGRAPHY STYLE SHEET: This guide tells you how to keep track of where you get your information. It lists the parts that must be included in your bibliography and then shows you what this looks like.

PRINT SOURCES

Book with one author:

1. Author, last name first.
2. Title of book. (underlined)
3. City of publication:
4. Publisher, date of publication.

Example:
Stewart, Paul. Rabbit's Wish. New York: HarperCollins, 2001.

Book with two authors:

1. Authors, in order they are listed on the title page.
2. Title of book. (underlined)
3. City of publication:
4. Publisher, date of publication.

Example:
Denenberg, Dennis and Lorraine Roscoe. 50 American Heroes Every Kid Should Meet.
Brookfield, Connecticut: The Millbrook Press, 2001.

Encyclopedia and other familiar reference books:

1. Author of article. (if available)
2. "Title of article."
3. Title of book. (underlined)
4. Date of edition. (volume and page number not necessary if articles are arranged alphabetically)

Example:
Fehrenbacher, Don E. "Lincoln, Abraham." The New Book of Knowledge. 2001.

Article in a magazine:

1. Author. (if available)
2. "Title of article."
3. Periodical (Magaizine) title (underlined)
4. Date: page(s).

Example:
Chadwick, Douglas H. "Grizzlies." National Geographic July 2000: 2-25.

Article in a newspaper:

1. Author. (if available)
2. "Title of article."
3. Newspaper title (underlined)
4. Date: section and page(s).

Example:
Benedick, Robin. "Foreign Languages Thrive in Broward."
Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale) 20 August 2001: B1+.

ELECTRONIC SOURCES

 Article on CD-ROM:

1. Author. (if available)
2. "Title of article."
3. Title of product (CD name). (underlined)
4. Edition or version. (if relevant)
5. CD-ROM.
6. City of publication: Publisher, date of publication.

Example:
Potter, Beatrix. "The Tale of Peter Rabbit." Discis Books.
CD-ROM. Discis Knowledge Research, Inc., 1990.

ONLINE SOURCES

Encyclopedia from an online service:

1. Author. (if shown)
2. "Title of the article."
3. Name of encyclopedia. (underlined)
4. Name of publisher, date of publication, if available
5. Date of your visit
6. Name of the online service you used.
7. <Web address enclosed in angle brackets-starts with http:// or www>

Example:
Fehrenbacher, Don E. "Lincoln, Abraham." The New Book of Knowledge.
Grolier Online, 2001. 17 August 2001 School Board of Broward County, Florida.
<http://go.grolier.com>

WORLD WIDE WEB

Article from the World Wide Web:

1. Author. (if known)
2. "Title of the article."
3. Title of complete work. (if given)
4. Date of your visit
5. <Web address enclosed in angle brackets-starts with http:// or www>

Example:
"Global Warming." CNN. 13 July 2001.
http://www.CNN.com/SPECIALS/2001/globalwarming/

 

Social Studies for Kids-History

Go to the Social Studies for Kids site and you can look around for interesting history or put your project subject into the search bar to find specific resources for your work.
 

Animal Corner

Animal Corner is a great research site. It's "the place to meet the animals of the world. The website is graphically attractive and it includes many data sheets about various animals in different categories : wildlife, reptiles, pets, insects, farm animals, marine life, rainforests and Galapagos Wildlife."